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Let's talk about surrogacy!

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luha226083 View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote luha226083 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 07 December 2019 at 11:39am
Of course, surrogacy can be associated with certain risks. I think that only the main ones should be highlighted. Around the world, the legal status of surrogacy may vary. In some countries, such as the UK, Canada, Denmark, Australia, and New Zealand, the only surrogacy permitted is altruistic. Bulgaria, France, Germany, Italy, Portugal, and Spain all forms of surrogacy are forbidden. The intended will need to relinquish some control and trust the surrogate to carry the pregnancy. Most surrogacy journeys are successful, so intended parents can feel confident in trusting their surrogate to successfully deliver a child. Surrogacy can be expensive because of the number of people and services involved. In the clinic, they can help to find a way to finance the surrogacy treatment. It is important to be guided by a professional expert to ensure the process is completed safely and legally because can be complicated. Surrogacy involves different parts who need to be patient and flexible. I hope you have now a better understanding of most common risks of surrogacy.
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Tiana250157 View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Tiana250157 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 07 December 2019 at 12:40pm
Many childless couples is considered the main risk - the refusal of a surrogate mother to return the child. Drafting a surrogacy contract, or agreement, is crucial and can prevent serious legal problems down the road. If the surrogate mother changes her mind and wants to keep the baby, for example, the contract will compel her to relinquish the baby to its rightful parents. Make sure you check the laws in your country before proceeding with a surrogacy agreement. Another risk is the choice of an unscrupulous surrogate. Intended parents may find a prospective surrogate in two ways. Through their own networking and advertising efforts, or with the help of an clinic’s matching services. But I believe that the choice of a surrogate should be trusted in the clinic. Since finding a good surrogate on your own is almost impossible.
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Amanda250156 View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Amanda250156 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 07 December 2019 at 12:52pm
Also, many people worry about whose name will be written on the birth certificate. But the names that are entered on the baby’s original birth certificate will largely depend on country surrogacy laws. Many surrogacy-friendly country allow intended parents to file a pre-birth order, which instructs the hospital to enter the intended parents’ names on the original birth certificate. In other cases, the birth certificate may need to be re-issued with the intended parents’ names following additional legal work completed after the baby is born. In some country, same-sex couples will need to complete a second parent adoption in order for both parents to be listed on the birth certificate. In traditional surrogacy, the surrogate is the biological mother of the child, and her name will appear on the original birth certificate along with the intended father’s name. A stepparent adoption may be required for the other intended parent to be listed on the birth certificate.
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luha226083 View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote luha226083 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 07 December 2019 at 1:12pm
Undoubtedly, such risks exist, but in my opinion, it is very important to know the legal aspects of surrogacy depending on the country. It is also necessary to sign the corresponding legal agreement, where all aspects of surrogacy will be discussed. Surrogacy laws vary by country. The practice is only prohibited in a handful of country, but of those that do recognize surrogacy arrangements, some are more surrogacy-friendly than others. However, intended parents from any country should be able to successfully pursue surrogacy, as long as they work with a surrogate in a state where it is legal. Your surrogacy professional should be able to answer any legal questions you have and help you navigate the legal surrogacy process in your country. Regardless of where you and your surrogate live, every surrogacy arrangement will involve a legal contract. You and your surrogate will each have your own attorney who will contribute to the contract drafting process and ensure your legal interests are represented and your rights are protected. These contracts will outline everyone’s rights and responsibilities throughout the process, potential risks and agreed-upon compensation. After the first trimester, you may also work with your attorney to complete a pre-birth order and establish yourselves as the legal parents of your child.
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Tiana250157 View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Tiana250157 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 07 December 2019 at 1:28pm
First of all, when a couple are ready to commit to the surrogacy process, they should start by determining their goals for surrogacy journey. First, the couple must choose the most suitable type of surrogacy. And the surrogacy professional they would like to work with. Once they have identified the surrogacy professional, surrogacy specialist can help navigate the process and achieve surrogacy goals. The relationship surrogate has with baby will depend on the type of surrogacy. In traditional surrogacy, the surrogate acts as the egg donor as well as the carrier, making her the biological mother of the baby. In these cases, she will have parental rights that need to be legally terminated when the baby is born. In gestational surrogacy, on the other hand, the embryo is created using the intended mother’s (or donor’s) egg and the intended father’s (or donor’s) sperm, and the surrogate has no genetic relationship to the baby she carries. In these cases, the surrogate, also called a gestational carrier, does not have any parental rights to the child.
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luha226083 View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote luha226083 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 07 December 2019 at 2:48pm
Amanda also asked our opinion on how to choose a surrogate. The surrogate’s medical history—this should include a genetic profile (traditional surrogates only), blood tests and obstetric history.
The surrogate’s lifestyle choices including their history of drinking and substance abuse. The cost of the surrogacy process—this includes surrogacy compensation, health and life insurance, legal fees, psychological screening and monitoring, travel costs, medical expenses, and egg donation compensation and expenses (if applicable) . The legal issues—the laws on surrogacy vary from state to state, so the location of your surrogate is an important issue to consider. What kind of relationship you wish to have with the surrogate after the child is born—you may wish the surrogate to remain an integral part of your child’s life, or have the relationship complete upon delivery. When you are looking for a surrogate with whom you can entrust the first nine months of your baby’s life, you will want to find someone who will treat the pregnancy as if it were her own. Ultimately, the key to making the right choice, is finding a surrogate that you can trust completely and with whom you can feel at ease.
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Tiana250157 View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Tiana250157 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 07 December 2019 at 3:19pm
Yes, indeed, I would also like to express my opinion on this matter and provide some recommendations on choosing a surrogate. In my opinion, the surrogate should be:
Entirely trustworthy, responsible, and committed to seeing the pregnancy through to completion.
Aware of the potential risks in any pregnancy and the particular risks of surrogacy.
A resident in a state that allows surrogate procedures. If she lives in a state with laws banning surrogacy, she would be performing an illegal act, even if your state is favorable to the procedure.
In excellent health, and someone who has given birth to a healthy child previously, so she knows what to expect all the way through. She is also more likely to readily deliver the newborn baby she carried into the hands of the intended parents without a painful period of separation and loss. She should be a non-smoker who has never used drugs, and should agree to remain smoke-free and alcohol-free throughout, including during a pre-implantation period.
Someone who has a healthy home environment with a network of family and friends to rely on for support as she goes through the experience of being a surrogate.
Financially stable and motivated more by a desire to help fulfill personal and family goals than by financial gain.
A woman between the ages of 21 to 35 years—the best range to deal with the emotional and physical challenges that lie ahead.
Mentally and emotionally healthy, as indicated by a psychological screening and thorough interview. She should not have any history of mental illness or post-partum depression. A positive person with an upbeat, forward-looking view of life is most likely to weather the emotional and physical ups and downs of pregnancy with a healthy, balanced attitude.
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Amanda250156 View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Amanda250156 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 07 December 2019 at 4:00pm
Girls, thank you for sharing your opinion regarding the search for a surrogate and my other questions. But I also wanted to add some important details that you did not mention. A contract between the intended parents and the surrogate is absolutely mandatory. Contracts exist to clearly set out the expectations of all parties in any relationship, business or personal. Surrogate IVF is a relatively new process in legal terms, and, as a result, the laws are vague or non-existent. Here are just a few of the overlapping legal, ethical, and medical questions that may arise during the pre-pregnancy and pregnancy period: Will you have amniocentesis performed when your surrogate becomes pregnant? How will you be prepared to respond to the outcomes? If multiple pregnancies—specifically, triplets or more—result, will you choose to selectively reduce, and will she be willing to undergo this procedure? If there is a diagnosis of Down syndrome or another more severe condition, will you terminate the pregnancy, or proceed, and will your surrogate agree? Discuss and come to a consensus with your surrogate, and then make sure that your contract includes stipulations as to how each of these eventualities will be handled. Also, I know that there are many myths on the Internet regarding surrogacy. So where do you look for the truth, what do you think? Your opinion is very interesting to me!
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luha226083 View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote luha226083 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 07 December 2019 at 7:07pm
There will always be myths, in any field. As a society, we can approach them in two ways. Either we accept whatever we hear, or we question them and seek the truth. The most common myth is as follows: I won’t be able to bond with my baby. In recent years, a great deal of attention has been focused on the emotional bond that develops between a mother and her child. This bond is very special, and is extremely important to the child’s future development. Recent research suggests, however, that it is less the result of carrying the child to term than it is the result of subsequent nurturing. It begins with the birth of the child. The child is handed to his or her parents at the hospital. Many intended mothers report feeling a connection with their newborn immediately. Intended parents are involved in the surrogacy process at every step, and a study recently conducted suggests that positive relationships are actually encouraged by the surrogacy process.

Another common myth: My surrogate is in it for the money. Gestational surrogacy is expensive, but the compensation paid out covers expenses, time, effort, and health risks. Prospective surrogate mothers must also meet a simple but strict list of qualifications. Surrogate mothers tend to be warm, compassionate, and altruistic women, who are interested in providing this unique service to help start a new family. A surrogate mother faces all of the bodily changes, health risks, and other concerns of any woman carrying a baby. In addition, stringent demands are made on a surrogate mother’s lifestyle, her activities, and her daily routine. She is responsible for the well-being of another person’s child. The pregnancy itself takes up nine months of her time, with the entire legal and medical process combining into a procedure that lasts more than a year. It seems to me that finding the truth is not so difficult. It is necessary to consult with good specialists, to study information on thematic forums. And also it is worth reading the news of the scientific world. It may seem strange to you, but I also think that there is a lot of useful information about surrogacy on YouTube.
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Tiana250157 View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Tiana250157 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 08 December 2019 at 6:03pm
Indeed, on this platform there is a lot of useful information about surrogacy. By the way, thank you for the recommendation. In the last conversation, you recommended me to pay attention to the channel of the clinic named Biotexcom. During this time, I managed to watch almost all of their videos. They really tell the truth about the process of surrogacy and possible difficulties. Recently, I read information that one of the doctors in this clinic developed a method such as autotransplantation of endometrium. I hope that soon a video on the subject of this development will be released on their channel.
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Amanda250156 View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Amanda250156 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 08 December 2019 at 7:08pm
And it seems to me that today the most common myth sounds like this - a friend should carry my child for me. But a friend does not benefit from the experience or preparation. Besides using an independent surrogate could also lead to legal issues. Without a formal gestational surrogacy agreement, arranged in a state where such agreements are legally protected, legal problems abound for those who have attempted to find a surrogate on their own. While these cases don’t happen frequently, it still underscores the major risk and inconvenience when deciding to use independent surrogates over an agency. Make sure you check on the surrogacy laws in your area before deciding to use a surrogate. On this channel I liked the video “How to be prepared for your baby's birth” the most. By the way, the channel is called "The Other Side: What is Behind Your Surrogacy Process". You forgot to mention the name of this channel. This video is really very informative. I am glad that people started recognizing the efforts of doctors for surrogacy.
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Tiana250157 View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Tiana250157 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 08 December 2019 at 7:57pm
Yes, I watched this video, it interested me in the first place. Have you watched a video that talked about Mitochondrial Replacement? If you have not seen it, then be sure to look. This is very useful information for childless couples. The fact is that this option has become available in the clinic in the VIP package. In my opinion, this is great news! I hope their videos will be released more often.
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Amanda250156 View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Amanda250156 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 08 December 2019 at 8:04pm
Yes, I watched this video, it is really very useful. I also hope that their videos will be released as often as possible. However, I have recently become interested in the psychological aspects of surrogacy. After all, this is also a very important part of the process, right? Not only a surrogate may feel difficulties in the process of participation in the program, but also potential parents. And sometimes they have an even harder time emotionally. What do you think about this?
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Tiana250157 View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Tiana250157 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 15 December 2019 at 5:39pm
Yes, unfortunately this is so, I agree with you. Surrogacy is typically somewhat emotionally challenging for most people, especially women. It’s important for women to grieve the loss of not carrying her baby and what that means to her. Instead of focusing on not having the ability to carry a baby, think about the positive aspects of not being pregnant such as avoiding weight gain, not feeling uncomfortable, sleeping more soundly, and not having morning sickness. The reality is pregnancy is not a state of bliss for most women. Don’t be afraid to reach out to a professional mental health provider specializing in reproductive psychology. This can be a challenging process for anyone.
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luha226083 View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote luha226083 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 15 December 2019 at 5:49pm
Yes, of course, the psychological aspects of this issue are extremely important. Because not only a surrogate is faced with emotional stress, but also potential parents. It’s important to realize that gestational surrogacy is asking an intended parent to trust another person (a stranger if you are using an agency) to take care of something that is the most important thing in the world to them. This takes a huge leap of faith. However, if intended parents aren’t able to trust their carrier and are constantly micromanaging her, the arrangement is doomed to be problematic. The emotional task of intended parents is to let go of the control of the pregnancy. Yet stay closely involved and allow the carrier to do the best job she can.
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Amanda250156 View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Amanda250156 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 15 December 2019 at 5:57pm
Yes girls, I agree with you. Also, many parents ask the following question: What should my relationship be with my surrogate before, during and after surrogacy? It seems to me that the most important, be open to seeing where the relationship goes. It is critical that the relationship grow to be trusting, respectful and positive fairly quickly and remain that way throughout the surrogacy. It may be that you and your carrier have a pleasant business like relationship; perhaps you will be soul mates. One is not better than the other, just different, and hard to predict in one match meeting. Just like everyone else, gestational carriers like to be appreciated and thanked for their efforts. Just keep it positive and respectful at all times. If you are really struggling with feelings of negativity towards your carrier, seek guidance from a mental health provider.
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luha226083 View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote luha226083 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 15 December 2019 at 6:06pm
Unfortunately, many potential parents have disagreements with a surrogate. This mainly refers to the surrogate that were found in the ad. I would recommend avoiding such women. But anyway the best thing to do when there is a disagreement is to talk to your surrogate in an honest, respectful, and non-reactive way. Speak to her as soon as there is an issue. It’s easy to let small problems get blown out of proportion. If this makes you anxious, utilize your resources to help guide you with the conversation, such as your agency or nursing staff, or mental health provider.
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Tiana250157 View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Tiana250157 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 15 December 2019 at 6:13pm
Unfortunately, many potential parents think that the surrogate will become attached to their child and will not want to give the baby back. Although, it seems to me, these fears are in vain. Most gestational carriers who are from reputable agencies do not become so attached to the baby that they fight for the right to be the parent. Surrogates are growing and babysitting your child for nine months and have a very good understanding of that concept. However, just as a long term babysitter might be sad to say goodbye to a child they cared for, your carrier might be a bit sad to see the baby go home with you. This is completely normal. They will also be filled with pride and joy for how they were able to help. There is a huge difference between shedding a few tears when saying goodbye to the baby versus wanting to keep the child for her own. Most gestational carriers say that the hardest part of their job is not leaving the baby, but saying goodbye to the intended parents. After the birth, when parents are busy with a newborn, they don’t contact the carrier as much as they did before delivery. Carriers miss talking with their intended parents on a regular basis and having that close relationship.
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Amanda250156 View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Amanda250156 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16 December 2019 at 7:37am
Indeed, the girls, we are all different and perceives everything that happens also in different ways. However, it seems to me that all these problems can be solved. I would like to touch upon another important topic. It is known that many childless couples compare surrogacy and adoption. What do you think is the main difference? What takes less time and money? What would you choose in this situation?
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Tiana250157 View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Tiana250157 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16 December 2019 at 7:44am
Of course, surrogacy is very different from adoption. First of all, it is necessary to mention genetics. In gestational surrogacy, the surrogate mother is not related to the child she carries. Instead, she becomes pregnant through an embryo transfer using the intended parents’ or donors’ genetic materials. This is one of the biggest differences between gestational surrogacy and adoption. In adoption, the birth mother is the biological mother of her child, which can have legal and emotional implications that aren’t applicable to surrogacy. Women facing unplanned pregnancies often have more complicated emotions to process and different factors to consider than surrogate mothers. The surrogacy process also allows one or both intended parents to be the genetic parents of their child.
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